Ten Ways To Boost Your Child's Confidence

Childlike Self-Esteem

Strengthening the self-confidence of your kindergarten child is associated with a great responsibility - after all The self-esteem of your child is the basis of your future when it begins to go its own way. ""Self-confidence comes from a sense of belonging, belief in one's own ability, and the knowledge that our efforts are valuable and valued,"" said Jane Nelsen, Californian family therapist and author of the book series Positive Discipline ,

""Adults know that self-confidence is a flowing experience,"" says Nelsen. ""Sometimes we feel comfortable in our skin and sometimes not. What we really have to teach our children are vital skills like getting up after setbacks. ""

Your goal as a parent should be to ensure that your child develops pride and self-confidence - both in himself and his cultural roots - as well as the ability to master the challenges of life (for a kindergarten child, this can mean, for example, letters to write off correctly).

How to Give Your Child Self-Confidence

Here are ten easy ways to boost your child's self-confidence:

Unconditional Love

A child's self-confidence will flourish when it says, ""Me love you no matter who or how you are ""experiencing unconditional love. Your child will develop best if you take it as it is, regardless of its strengths or weaknesses, temperament, or abilities. Overflow your child with love. Cuddle it, kiss it, give praise it. And do not forget to say how much you love it.

If you have to admonish your child, make it clear that it is his behavior, what you reprimand - not his person. For example, instead of saying, ""You are a naughty boy! Why can not you be good? ""- rather say:"" It's not nice to push Gabriel. That hurts! Please do not push! ""

Pay attention

Take time to pay undivided attention to your kindergarten child. This works wonders for your child's self-esteem because it conveys the message that it is important and valuable. It does not even have to be much time. It may be a pause while looking through the mail or turning off the television to give an answer.

Make eye contact to make it clear that you are really listening.When you are in stress, let your child know without ignoring it. For example, say, ""Tell me about the picture you painted, and then I'll have to make the supper. ""

Set limits

Make some understandable rules. If you tell your sweetheart to eat his snack in the kitchen, do not let him wander around the living room with biscuits and fruits the next day.

Or if you teach him to put the dirty clothes in the laundry box, do not allow it to throw them to the floor the next day. Knowing that some rules are irrefutable will give your child more security. It requires regular repetition from you, but soon your child will meet your expectations. Stay clear and consistent and show your child that you trust that it is doing the right thing.

Limited Risk Support

Help your child find new ways to try new food, find a new friend or ride a bicycle. Even if there is always the possibility of failure - there is no chance of success without risk. Let your child experiment in a certain setting and suppress the urge to help him. Do not try to ""save"" your child if it frustrates trying out a new toy. Jumping with the words, ""I'll do it for you"" can promote addiction and weaken your child's self-confidence. Your self-confidence and independence will be strengthened if you find the right balance between protection and ""long leash"".

Allow Errors

Of course, your child will make mistakes when it can take risks. But these are valuable experiences for his self-confidence. So, if your child puts his plate too close to the edge and it falls, encourage it to think about what can make it better next time. In this way, his self-confidence will not be damaged and it will understand that it is okay to make mistakes. If you make a mistake yourself, admit it, says Daniel Meier, Lecturer in Education at San Francisco State University. Admitting mistakes is a strong message to your child. This makes it easier to deal with your own failures.

Highlighting the Positive

Everyone responds to encouragement, so try to acknowledge the good things your child does on a daily basis - so your child hears it too. For example, say to his father, ""Michael cleaned the vegetables for dinner today."" Your child will bask in your praise and the response of his father. Be specific. Do not just say ""well done,"" but ""thank you for waiting so patiently in line"". This strengthens your child's sense of accomplishment and self-esteem. It knows exactly what did it right.

Listening Well

If your child wants to talk, stop and listen to what it has to say. He needs to know that his thoughts, feelings, desires and opinions matter.

Help him deal with his feelings by calling them. ""I understand that you are sad because you have to say goodbye to your friends. ""If you accept his feelings without judgment, you give him a sense of his emotions and how to express them. Share your own feelings with your child so that they have the confidence to name their feelings.

Compare Resist

Comments like ""Why can not you be more like your sister"" or ""Why are not you as good as Peter? "", Your child will only remember his inadequacies and awaken shame, envy and rivalries. Even positive comparisons such as ""You're the best player"" pose a risk because a child may have trouble fulfilling that image in the future. If you make it clear to your child that you love it for its uniqueness, it will also appreciate itself.

Offer Compassion

When your child compares to his friends or siblings to his disadvantage (""Why can not I catch like Sophia?""), You should show compassion to him and then highlight one of his strengths. For example: ""Yes, you are right, Sophia is catching well. And you paint great pictures "". This teaches your child that it has strengths and weaknesses and that you do not have to be perfect to like yourself.

Encouraging

Every child needs the signals of their parents saying, ""I believe in you. I recognize your progress. Keep it up! ""Encouragement means acknowledging progress - not just success. So, if your kindergartner tries to close his jacket buttons, do not say, ""Well, not like that. Let me do it ""but"" You really worked hard and you made it! ""

There is a difference between praise and encouragement. One rewards the task while the other rewards the person (""You did it!"" Instead of ""I'm proud of you!""). Praise can give a child the feeling that it is only good if it has done something perfect. Encouragement, on the other hand, simply recognizes the effort.

""Explain your picture. I see that you like violet ""is more helpful than saying,"" This is the most beautiful picture I have ever seen. ""Too much praise can destroy self-confidence, as it can put the child under pressure to produce and be too dependent on the praise of others. Be praising and fair with praise and generous with encouragement. It will help your child to feel comfortable in their skin.

Popular Posts

Recommended,2018

Play to promote movement
Toddler

Play to promote movement

The following game ideas promote the physical development of your child and can be easily integrated into the daily routine. Here you will find enough material for even the most active child. Climbing and Balancing Doodling and Painting Dressing and Undressing Filling and Pouring Forming and Kneading Pulling and Pushing Rolling and Pedaling Running and Jumping Stacking
Read More
Gifts for four-year-old boys
Family

Gifts for four-year-old boys

A whole world in miniature Variable game worlds in which The child can always build something new and reenact his everyday experiences and fantasies, have a strong attraction for four-year-old boys. These include, for example, a Brio wooden train, whose mechanisms are appropriate for the kindergarten age both when building up and while playing (the guarded Märklin-Bahn of dad takes too much damage if Junior gets her hands on it).
Read More
Public and Commercial Cord Blood Banks: Addresses
Pregnancy

Public and Commercial Cord Blood Banks: Addresses

Public umbilical cord blood banks for donations Cord Blood Bank Dusseldorf José Carreras Foundation University Hospital Duesseldorf / Building 14. 88 Moorenstrasse 5 40225 Duesseldorf Tel: 0211 / 81 04343 eMail: cbb @ itz. uni-duesseldorf. de José Carreras Stem Cell Bank List with the withdrawal clinics
Read More
Food by age: 0 to 4 months
Baby

Food by age: 0 to 4 months

Breastmilk (or baby milk) - your baby does not need any more Just a few years ago, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Breastfeeding Committee recommended that babies up to the age of six only breastfeed, because that is the best for her health. Today it is recommended to breastfeed at least until the beginning of the 5th month.
Read More
Drinks for my child
Baby

Drinks for my child

From the third meal onwards babies should regularly take about 200 Drink ml a day. Before, the mother and baby milk quenches the thirst. At and between meals the little ones should always be offered something. The best are still, low-sodium mineral water and unsweetened herbal and fruit teas. For a change of taste
Read More
How do I treat burns and scalds?
Toddler

How do I treat burns and scalds?

Burning and scalding is one of the most common childhood accidents. In Germany alone, there are about 6,000 children every year who need hospital treatment in the hospital. Injuries of this kind are among the most painful of all. Temperatures as low as 52 degrees Celsius damage the skin. The causes are hot liquids
Read More