How to Protect Your Back and Pelvis

Fix Anterior Pelvic Tilt In 3 EASY STEPS! | NO MORE LOWER BACK, HIP & NECK PAIN! (December 2018).

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How to wear the back of the new load

As your baby grows, the pressure on your spine increases. This adjusts your posture to compensate for the weight of the baby. You may find that the arch of your lower back is emphasized, and you feel as if you are leaning backwards. These changes are necessary to balance you out. They also serve the purpose of protecting your back and hip joints.

In some women, the back becomes flatter during pregnancy, especially if they do not ""proudly carry"" their tummy.

Whether the back becomes rounder or flatter, it seems to be closer to your starting point before pregnancy than to your activities during pregnancy. By the way, postural changes during pregnancy have not proven to be the cause of back pain.

Probably the loosening of the tissue (and pelvic floor) is closely related to back pain; the back tries to balance the pelvic floor weakness.

The muscles of your back, abdomen and pelvic floor are designed to move and stabilize the joints in these areas. The progressive growth of the uterus and baby makes the work of the muscles harder, which can result in back pain during pregnancy. Your back suffers faster under stress than a person who is not pregnant.

Hormones, such as estrogen and relaxin, cause your hip joints to loosen up a bit. This favors pelvic pain or a symphyseal loosening. This also goes hand in hand with the loosening of the tissue: The cartilage between the pubic bone becomes loose and mobile, which leads to pain.

How can I protect my back?

Avoid lifting heavy objects. Since your ligaments are more compliant, the risk of injury increases.

If you need to lift or carry something, keep it close to your body, bend your knees when bending over, not your back. Always keep your shoulders streamlined, your back straight (as vertical as possible) - this strengthens the pelvic floor! and avoid twists.

If you have a baby, allow it to climb onto a chair or a sofa before you lift it up. If your child is older then persuade them to climb themselves on higher chairs or in the car seat if possible. When shopping, you should evenly distribute the weight of your goods on two carrying bags - one for each hand.

Do exercises regularly. Research has shown that you can reduce the risk of developing back pain by exercising on a weekly basis. Unfortunately, this does not necessarily relieve your pelvis at the same time. The most suitable exercises include swimming, walking, cycling, pilates, yoga and pregnancy gymnastics in the water.

Your midwife can give you tips on where to do special courses for pregnant women in your area. It is very important that the course instructors have the appropriate experience or qualification in the care of pregnant women. If you have pelvic pain or sympathetic loosening, you should ask your midwife for advice.

Wear comfortable shoes. Some women prefer to wear flat shoes, others prefer heels to take the pressure off the back. Basically, if you have a strongly arched lower back, higher heels will increase the roundness, while flat shoes will do the opposite.

Improve your attitude. Standing up, imagine someone pulling you up with a thread attached to the back of your head. It's best to straighten your abdominal and pelvic muscles to support the back. It is always good to catch the burden of the back, sometimes in the legs, d. H. make soft knees. This makes the back rounder, and the weight is held by the legs.

The so-called pelvic or pelvic swing helps relieve your back when you need to stand longer.

  • Start this exercise by placing your back against a wall.
  • Position your feet a few inches from the wall, and allow your knees to flex slightly.
  • Now push your hand into your hollow back and tilt your pelvis back so that your back pinches your hand.
  • Now you tilt it in the opposite direction until you feel the pressure on your hand wane.
  • Continue by tilting your pelvis rhythmically forward and backward several times.

If you have enough exercise, you can do it without a wall.

The exercise works best if you do it regularly - preferably before the first pain appears.

Sitting Pelvic Tilts:

  • To do the pelvic tilt sitting down, allow your upper body to sag and push your back and pelvis forward until you are sitting straight.
  • Sit comfortably but upright. When sitting, make sure that your back is well supported.
  • Try to put a rolled-up towel in your hollow back - or ask your physiotherapist for a special lumbar roll (a round or semicircular back support).
  • Sitting upright in a dining room chair is better for your back than sitting in a soft chair, armchair or sofa.

Repeat pelvic tilting on the wall or sitting every 10 to 15 minutes five to ten times in a row. If you have to sit for a long time, try to get up every 20 minutes and walk around a bit.

Also try kneeling on all fours. This position is great for reducing the pressure that your baby's weight puts on your back.

Try to take this position several times and regularly throughout the day. First make a ""hump"" by sliding the tailbone down and then form a hollow back with your back so that you stick out your buttock.

Repeating this alternately in a kind of rocking motion, the exercise can be very effective against back or pelvic pain.

Regular belly dancing (pelvic swings, circling, rocking) helps against back pain and is fun with the right music!

Pelvic floor and abdominal exercises can help relieve your back during pregnancy. It is important in pregnancy to get a feeling for the pelvic floor. Always tense and let go, determine rhythm and strength, which strengthens the pelvic floor and provides security for the pelvic floor feeling.

How to move and rest without straining your back or pelvis

The following advice will help you reduce the pain of moving. But even if you do not have more severe back or pelvic pain, the tips are helpful as they generally make moving with the growing belly easier.

Lying down to sleep.

Avoid lying on your back, especially from half of gestation, as the baby may otherwise press on blood vessels. This can lead to dizziness and obstruction of blood flow into the placenta. Try to lie on the side (best on the left, as this will improve blood flow to the placenta), and place one or two pillows between your knees and another under your stomach.

If your waist sinks too much into the mattress, support it with a rolled-up towel. Alternatively, you can buy a long, sausage-shaped pregnancy pillow. It makes turning around at night easier because you only have to reposition a cushion.

Turning around in bed.

If you want to turn from the supine position to the right side, do it this way: Tighten your pelvic floor and abdominal muscles and ankle your left leg. Turn your head to the right and guide your left arm to the right side of your body. Stick to your quilt or mattress if possible.

To turn around now, pull with your left hand and move your left leg to the right so you roll to the right side.Do it the other way round if you want to turn to the left side.

Getting up from bed.

Roll your legs sideways, drop your feet over the edge of the bed, and push up with your arms. Do it in reverse order if you want to lie down.

Getting up from a sitting position.

Tilt the pelvis forward and back several times. Sit with outstretched chest on the edge of the chair. Open your knees and lean forward until your nose is above your knees. Keep your back straight. Now stand up by pushing your arms up from the chair, keeping your back straight and moving your head diagonally upwards.

This method keeps your back and pelvic joints in their most stable position, reducing pain in most cases.

Leaving the bathtub.

Sit on your side as you sit, and then walk on your hands and knees. Now stand up by leaning on the edge of the tub and the handle.

Hold tight, curl your back and move one leg at a time across the edge of the tub. Always use a doormat to prevent slipping.

If you have back problems, talk to your midwife about exercises. She can also help with homeopathy and acupuncture.

Do not forget to download our free app for interesting daily information about your pregnancy. ""My Baby Today"" gives you all the expert-tested answers you need - always at hand!

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