Good sleep habits from 24 to 36 months

Normal Sleep

Between the second and third birthday, your child may need about one night eleven hours sleep and one to one and a half hours sleep in the afternoon. Most children go to bed between 7pm and 9pm and wake up between 6am and 8am. But even though it seems that your child's sleep habits fit yours, the light dream periods (REM sleep) are much more pronounced up to the age of four, compared to adults. Specifically, this means that it undergoes more changes of sleep phases than you and thus wakes more frequently. That is why your child should learn to fall asleep alone - if you want to sleep through the nights.

How to Help Your Child Fall asleep

Now that your child is older, you can try some new techniques that will help your child sleep well. These include:

Bound it into a big bed and praise it if it stays there.

At this age, your toddler is probably ready to move to a cot, presumably outgrowing his cot. A new sibling can also be crucial for this decision.

If you are pregnant again, have your child move to their new bed at least six to eight weeks before the delivery date. This advice is given by most experts, because otherwise a child feels a reset when the new baby takes over his cot. But if your child is not ready for the change, then postpone until the baby is three or four months old - the baby will spend most of his time in his cradle anyway. At the same time, your child can get used to the idea of ​​a sibling, which makes it easier to change from a litter to a crib.

Other reasons to change to a real bed are: If the child constantly climbs out of his cot or if you start the toilet training - maybe your child has to go to the bathroom at night.

As soon as your child uses his new bed, praise it well if it stays there in the evening and at night. With the cot restrictions, you may not be able to get out of bed for ""big kids"" often enough, simply because it has the opportunity. When that happens, you will react calmly and definitely. Then take your baby back to bed, tell him seriously, bedtime is now and leave the room. If your child does not want to stay in bed, experts recommend different strategies. Please read below our solution suggestions.

fulfill wishes and integrate into the routine.

Your child could now start trying to delay his bedtime by begging for ""just one more story"" or a song more or a glass of water. Try to fulfill all the usual (and understandable) wishes of your child and include them in your daily bedtime ritual. Then you can give your child a extra wish, but make it clear that this is the limit. So your little one has the feeling to get his way, but in truth you get yours.

Give him an extra goodnight kiss.

To promise an extra good-night kiss when you first cover your child is fine. Promise your child that you will be back in a few minutes. Your chances are good that your little one is already sleeping happily on your return.

Possible traps

If your child gets up more often after putting it in the crib, bring it back, cover it up and say ""good night"" to it. Other alternatives to deal with this situation, of course, remain at your fingertips. Read below the suggested solutions from sleep experts.

Another common sleep problem at this age is incipient infighting. You can circumnavigate or at least mitigate this cliff by taking your child's wishes into account and steering them in the right direction. Realistically, of course, no child is happy to go to bed in the evening, so be prepared for arguments. Again, our next chapter may offer you advice.

You may have noticed that your child has recently developed some night fears, such as fear of the dark, monsters under the bed, or separation anxiety. This is normal for toddlers, so do not worry. Fears are part of the development. When your little one starts having nightmares, go straight to him and talk to him about bad dreams while calming down: If the bad dreams keep coming back, look for their cause in daily life. Your child could also suffer from night terrors that are different from nightmares. Most experts agree that it's okay to bring such a frightened child to bed.

Suggested Solutions for Sleep Problems

The two most common sleep problems at this age are falling asleep and frequent nocturnal waking. What can you do if your child wakes up in the middle of the night, even though it is old enough to sleep through? If you want it to sleep at night without waking you, then you need to learn to calm yourself down by sucking on your thumb, cuddling a reference object, or some other type. Most experts agree that you can be Child should not get used to external influences, including music, light and food or drink.When that happens, your little one will need those things before falling asleep again.

If you want your child to sleep through, there are several ways you can try:

Solution 1: Perform a simple review. When your child cries, go back to his room. Pats his back and tell him that everything is alright, but it has to sleep now. Do not lift it up and do not hug it, be gentle but determined. Are you going. Wait five minutes, then go back to him. Repeat this process until your child sleeps. Extend the period between visits a little more. As long as the sleeping-ritual remains the same, the waking up at night will disappear within a few weeks.

Solution 2: Stick to your regular routine and bedtime rituals, do not let your child set up their own sleeping schedule. Do not hold it on your lap, do not weigh it, and make sure that your child does not rely on his pacifier or bottle to fall asleep. Although these things help in the short term, in the long term your child teaches you to be dependent instead of falling asleep without help. If your child wakes up at night and calls for you, go to him and comfort him - but do not stay. Go back out of the room. If your child keeps calling you, slowly increase the intervals you come in (five minutes, ten minutes, fifteen minutes), but keep insisting that you're there.

If your baby does not stay in bed, tell him you'll close the door. If the warning alone is not enough, close the door and leave it closed for about a minute (but never lock it!). If your child does not go to bed afterwards, carry it over, go out and close the door for two minutes, then three, then five. Five minutes is the maximum in the first night. As soon as your child goes to bed alone, open the door, praise it and then walk without entering the room. If your child also gets up in the following nights, you can keep the door closed longer. On the seventh night up to half an hour on the fourth attempt.

Solution 3: The fear of separation still continues at this age, and at the same time the will to self-determination grows, so your child may refuse to go to bed. It might help if some things can decide for themselves at bedtime (which pajamas to wear or which story to read to him). Give him reference objects such as stuffed animals or have a night light or the hall light burn. If your child is still calling for you, wait ten minutes before calming down, then go out of the room and repeat if necessary.You should not scold or punish your little one. Maybe it just wants your attention, then you should put it right back in bed and leave the room as soon as possible. Stay calm and persistent - your child will quickly realize that you are not giving in. Check if your child is not too hot and your pajamas are not sitting or pinching uncomfortably. If your child wants a night light or the door should stay open, that's fine.

Solution 4: Make sure your bedtime ritual is enjoyable and safe. If your child calls you before falling asleep, do not go right away. Instead, call him where you are and how proud you are to learn to fall asleep on your own. Normally, toddlers at this age can fall asleep alone when they wake up at night, often talking to themselves and practicing their new vocabulary. But many children still have trouble sleeping through. To solve this, your child must learn to find his way back to dreamland - even without your help. If it starts up in the middle of the night, because it is frightened, is afraid of monsters or other fantasy creatures, then it will be difficult for your little one to go back to sleep. Assure him that it is safe and you are near him. But do not start right away if you hear your child complaining, it really has to learn how to handle the problem on its own.

Solution 5: Stick to your rituals. Infants of this age need the consistency that is contained in them. Other possibilities are: to cuddle with the child or to put oneself to sleep. You can also try the factual, ""adult"" attempt: Get ready for bed and follow your own routine. Your child may fall asleep while watching you. Spend a lot of time with him during the day and let Papa play the aid sandman in the evening. So both parents can help their child fall asleep. If your child has already slept through, but is now experiencing a development spurt, then it will wake up more often at night. When that happens, try to calm it down without getting it out of bed. Instead, pat his back, talk to him gently or sing something to him. You can also take it with you to your own bed.

The ""golden way"" does not exist when you try to encourage your child to fall asleep and sleep. You need to find a solution that works for you and your family.

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