Good sleep habits from 18 to 24 months

Normal Sleep

Your child should now sleep and sleep for about 10 to 12 hours at night to take a nap of about two hours. Some kids even take two naps a day until their second birthday - if yours is one of them, let them do it.

How to Help Your Child Fall asleep

At this age, some of the best ways to get your child to sleep and fall asleep are the following:

Teach him to fall asleep by himself

If you If you want your child to sleep through the night without calling after you, then it should now learn how to glide alone into the dreamland in the evening, without being rocked, breastfed or otherwise rocked to sleep.

When it learns to rely on external stimulus or help, it can not fall asleep at night even when it wakes up suddenly and no one is around. Imagine that, says expert Richard Ferber: They sleep with their heads on the pillow, then wake up in the middle of the night and the pillow is gone. They probably think about the pillow and start looking for it, so they wake up completely.

It's the same with your child. If it always falls asleep on a particular CD, it's surprising at night when it wakes up and hears no music. Once it's over excited, it can not just lie down and go back to sleep. To prevent this, put it to bed when it is tired but still awake, so that it can bring itself to sleep.

Offer Acceptable Alternatives

In this phase your child will explore the limits of his newfound independence - he wants to gain control over his environment. To avoid power struggles at bedtime, let your child make as many decisions as possible during the sleep-walking ritual: Which bedtime story it wants to hear, which pajamas it wants to wear.

The trick is to always offer only two or three choices that will make you live equally well. For example, do not ask, ""Do you want to go to bed?"". Then your little one could say ""no,"" and that's unacceptable. Instead, try the phrase, ""Would you like to go to bed now or in five minutes?"". This gives your child a choice, but you win regardless of how you choose.

Possible Traps

This age group presents you with a very special challenge: at some point between the ages of 18 and 24 months, children begin to climb out of their cot, putting themselves at risk (falling out of the cot can be extremely painful be).

It also makes bedtime travel a lengthy affair. Unfortunately, climbing out of the cot does not necessarily mean that your child is ready for a big bed. But our article ""The transition from lattice to cot"" can help you decide when it's time. In the meantime, make sure your child is safe and stay in the crib with the following tips from a sleep expert:

Lower Mattress : If you move the crib mattress to the lowest setting, then your child is probably physically unable to overcome the obstacle. Of course that will not work if it gets bigger.

Empty the Cot : Your child may use toys or side shields to get out. If you remove these things, it may stay in bed a bit longer.

Do not Reward Climbing : When your child climbs out of his cot, you do not respond by paying much attention to it or crawling it into your parent's bed. Instead, stay calm and neutral. Explain firmly that it should not climb out of bed and put it back in the cot. That will be understood pretty quickly by your little one.

Be Watchful : Keep an eye on his antics by placing yourself in a place where you can watch your child but can not see you. When it tries to climb out, immediately tell him to stop it. After some attempts, it will probably stay in his bed.

Safety First : If you can not stop your child from getting out of bed, you should at least make sure that nothing happens to him. Place cushions on the floor in front of the cradle and on the wardrobes and chests of drawers in the immediate vicinity, so that your baby can not tart anywhere. If climbing does not want to stop, you can open one side of the cot and put a chair in front of it. At least you do not have to worry about your climbing maximum falling and hurting. At least, if you can not win, you should not lose too ...

Suggested Solutions for Sleep Problems

The two most common sleep problems at this age are falling asleep and the frequent nocturnal awakenings. What can you do if your child wakes up in the middle of the night, even though it is old enough to sleep through? If you want it to sleep at night without waking you, then you need to learn to calm yourself down by sucking on your thumb, cuddling a reference object, or some other type.

Most experts agree that you should not get used to external influences, including music, light and something to eat or drink.When that happens, your little one will need those things before falling asleep again.

If you want your child to sleep through, there are several ways you can try.

Solution 1: As long as you let your child sleep alone in the evenings, at night you can do whatever you feel is right to calm you down - whether you're lulling it on your lap or slamming it on the floor. If his bedtime ritual remains the same, nocturnal waking will disappear within a few weeks. If that does not work, check your evening routine: if your child is crying, go to his room. Pats his back and tell him that everything is alright, but now is time to sleep. Do not lift it out of bed. Be gentle, but determined. Are you going. Wait a bit, then look again. Repeat this procedure until your child has fallen asleep. Extend the intervals between visits a little bit each time.

Solution 2: Your child should combine something comfortable with bedtime. You can achieve this by sticking to the same bedtime rituals. Make sure that your child falls asleep alone - without you, a pacifier or a bottle. These things only work for a short time. Your child will learn that it can only fall asleep with the help of such crutches instead of calming oneself. When it cries, go to it and comfort it, but do not stay until it has fallen asleep. Keep going out of the room and come back to assure that you're there for it when it needs you, but that you can not be its sleep aid.

Solution 3: Watch out for the time your child shows signs of tiredness - and make it their regular sleeping routine. On this occasion, create a quiet ritual and explain to your child what you are doing so that it understands what happens, when, and why. Whatever you take into the ritual, it should end so that your child lies awake and quiet in his cot to fall asleep by himself. If your child wakes up at night, do not pick it up or take it to bed. It has to learn to fall asleep again, even if it has to cry at first. Calm it down for a moment and look after it every five to ten minutes, until it sleeps peacefully again.

Solution 4: You can show your child strategies to calm themselves down. Give him a stuffed animal, a blanket, or show him his thumb as an aid. Your bedtime ritual should provide support and reassurance to your child. If it starts to cry at night, then interrupt your sleep by waking it up before you go to bed yourself. Cuddle and cuddle with him and give him something to eat or drink when needed.Then put it back in his bed and make sure you're there for it.

Solution 5: Move the nap to an earlier time, or shorten it if necessary. Stick to your bedtime ritual. Other possibilities are: to cuddle with the child or to put oneself to sleep. You can also try the factual, ""adult"" attempt: Get ready for bed and follow your own routine. Your child may fall asleep while watching you. If it wakes up at night, do not let it cry. Find the reason that has awakened it (eg a full diaper, hunger, an exciting daytime experience, stuffy nose or an uncomfortable pajamas). Spend a lot of time with him during the day and let Papa play the aid sandman in the evening. So both parents can help their child fall asleep. If your child has actually slept through, but is now experiencing a development spurt, then it will now wake up more often at night. When that happens, try to calm it down without getting it out of bed. Instead, pat his back, talk to him gently or sing something to him. You can also take it with you to your own bed.

The ""golden way"" does not exist when you try to encourage your child to fall asleep and sleep. You need to find a solution that works for you and your family.

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