Help with language acquisition

Children are very interested in human voices. They listen and focus on the voice of the one who speaks. This is the same for your toddler as it was when it was still a baby.

How can I support my child?

Talk to your child as often as possible - from day one. Of course, this should not happen under pressure or be exaggerated, because babies and toddlers also need times of rest and silence. Take the opportunity for ""four-eyes conversations"". If you are talking to or reading to both your toddler and an older sibling, your toddler will not hear as many repetitions as it takes. It works better if you talk to your child alone.

Watch your little one directly when you speak, because then it can observe your face, your facial expressions and your gestures. Try not to use too many unfamiliar words, but also to insert new words every now and then, which you then explain.

Combine language with actions and gestures. When you take off your child's sweater, say, ""So now we take off the sweater!"" And then, ""And now the shoes.""

Promote your child's love for reading. Even for babies, there are picture books that you can show and describe your child. For babies in the first few months, pictures with strong color contrasts such as black and white are particularly suitable because they are particularly good at recognizing this. Read daily with your child and visit the library regularly - Reading is of great importance for language development.

Show your toddler what you feel by adjusting your facial expression to what you say. At this point, your child does not understand that you just want to tease it. (Often, even adult ironies still misunderstand!) If you hug your child tightly and at the same time say, ""Hello, my big terrible monster!"", Just confuse your child. Your face says: ""Hello, my wonderful and lovable treasure!""

Your little one does not have to know every word you say. Help him to understand the general meaning of your words. When you cook, set the table, and then take your child by the hand and say, ""Lunch is ready,"" then it will understand that lunch is ready and come to the kitchen table - though perhaps without the outward signs it may not yet say so can mean what the words ""lunch"" or ""ready"" mean.Your child learns the meaning of single words by listening to them over and over again - in helpful situations.

Let your child share in your feelings and enthusiasm through the way you speak. Make your voice sound alive - whether you're talking about how much you love your baby or whether you want to show your baby a flock of birds. A lively and emotional way of speaking will arouse and hold your child's attention. It will want to know what you are saying.

How can I help my toddler communicate?

Show your child that language always means communication. If you babble on without expecting an answer (or just not looking like you would like one), or if you do not respond to questions from other family members, your child will believe that words are just meaningless sounds.

Be a good listener for your child. Let it finish, look at it while it speaks, and listen attentively and well-disposed. Especially toddlers should correct as little as possible, but simply respond positively to the speaking of your child, by showing genuine interest and respond to what has been said.

Avoid speech as background noise. If you are listening to the radio, tune in a music station. Unless you are really listening! And if you listen to the radio announcer, let your little one see that the invisible voice tells you something important.

Act as a translator. You understand your toddler much better than people who know it less well. So when other people say something and you realize that your child does not understand the statement, summarize it in your own words - your vocabulary is much more familiar to your child. That's why your child understands you and other familiar people better than strangers understand.

Very important is the statement of the famous Pediatrician Remo Largo: ""The best language support is a good relationship with the child."" When children feel loved, accepted and valued by their parents, they develop good self-esteem - a very important prerequisite for good language development.

How do I teach my child the difference between lying and truth?

Your child learns new words and can often use them correctly, but it does not yet recognize some meaning that seems natural to adults. For example, your baby does not yet know what a promise is. But it may already use the word. If you allow your child to play for another five minutes, and then go straight to bed, it may happily answer: ""Promise!"". The word itself means for your child but only consent. After the five minutes, it will want to play for another five minutes - and can not classify the charge in your voice when you say, ""You promised me .""

The distinction between fantasy and reality is also difficult for toddlers, the dog could be to blame for the puddle on the floor - your child wishes that it was the dog and claims that it was so is often so dominant for children that it blurs with reality.

When she quarrels with her sister, her toddler falls, hurts her knee and says her sister pushed it, but she did not really do that, but so did If you did not hurt your toddler's knee, it hurt his feelings , so your child is telling the ""felt"" truth - and in that case, it's just a coincidence that the adults are truthful Do not punish toddlers for lying, just gently explain that what your child says is not quite right, for example, if it contradicts, you can say, ""Sometimes we can not remember correctly ""

If your child is bigger (between three and four years of age, depending on your development), you can tell him that promises should be well considered and kept - that you (usually) tell the truth and (mostly) not lying. But it is still too early for that. Do not corner your child with things that they can not understand. It does its best to please you. But if you set standards that apply to children, but not to infants, then your little one can only lose.

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